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Slade School Of Fine Art In The Spotlight

Slade School Of Fine Art In The Spotlight
Slade MFA Interim Show 2015/16, installation view, photo credit: Slade School of Fine Art.

We visited the MFA Interim Show 2015/2016 of the Slade School of Art in London to see what the cool kids are up to as well as the latest works of art by our featured artists Yuxin Su and Emily Lazerwitz.

 

Yuxin presents a new series of paintings focusing on the sphere of time. In her new body of work she explores the way the contents inside the paintings function as metaphors while at the same time the paintings themselves can be seen as objects.

 

 

Slade MFA Interim Show 2015/2016, installation view, photo credit: Yiman Lin.

 

 

In her painting 'Reading the moon', Su is rendering the traces of the moving moon and its reflections on the window onto the canvas. The round shape and the image of the glass window keep repeating themselves and create a new space way beyond the window view. 

 

 

Yuxin Su, Reading the moon, 2015, oil on canvas, photo credit: Slade School of Fine Art.

 

 

'Pink fountain' also depicts the continuous flux in time and the way this movement is encapsulated in painting. The water of the fountain holds contradictory qualities - it is constantly changing while remaining still as a whole. 

 

 

Yuxin Su, Pink Fountain, 2015, oil and acrylic on canvas, photo credit: Slade School of Fine Art.

 

 

Slade MFA Interim Show 2015/16, installation view, photo credit: Yiman Lin.

 

 

For the Interim Show at Slade, Emily Lazerwitz presents two new series of works, 'The Weavers' [Ariadne, Philomela, Penelope] and 'The Nymphs' [Circe, Calypso], evolving and questioning the oxymoric logic of the myth how can you believe in something that you know is not true? If you cannot prove it is not true, how can it be false?

 

'I opened up my practice by giving more information to my audience through naming my work. In any myth names are incredibly important, and they are repeated constantly as a tool to access and remember the story. In the same way, my names are tools to access the work and understand the process and thinking behind them.'

 

 

Emily Lazerwitz, The NymphS (Circle, Calypso), photo-printed clothing, butcher meat hooks, photo credit: Yiman Lin.

 

 

In the Odyssey, Circe and Calypso both hold Odysseus captive and disrupt his journey back home. Circe turns Odysseus’s men into pigs after they feasted with her, while Calypso holds Odysseus captive for seven years to be her immortal husband. Both women use secrecy - and sorcery - as their power. Here, they are represented as encrypted texts whose meanings - or intentions - are hidden. The clothes themselves become a symbol of their femininity and charm, while the hook becomes the reminder of their violence and strength.

 

 

Emily, Lazerwitz, The Weavers (Ariadne, Philomela, Penelope), machine knit scarves, hand-punched knitting machine pattern, butcher meat hooks, photo credit: Yiman Lin.

 

 

Emily Lazerwitz, The Weavers (Ariadne, Philomela, Penelope), detail, machine knit scarves, hand-punched knitting machine pattern, butcher meat hooks, photo credit: Yiman Lin.

 

 

In the series ‘The Weavers’, Philomela is a knitting machine pattern and the voice. Philomela was raped by her sister’s husband who cut off her tongue so she could not tell her tale, which forced her to use her loom to speak. When read as a binary code, Emily's work reveals a short text. Penelope is the artist's shroud. She is the one who used to knit to bide time, and while she finds herself at the end of the Odyssey in a better fate than most, it is her maids’ end that are commemorated with the butcher hook and the unfinished ends. Penelope lives as her maids, the ones who helped her unravel the shroud every night, die hanging like so many weavers do in Greco-Roman mythology. Finally, Ariadne is the knotted, tangled thread. Ariadne saves her lover Theseus from the labyrinth by providing him the thread that allows him to find his way out after he slays the Minotaur, Ariadne’s brother. Ariadne never escapes her guilt and dies hanging after leaving her family only to be abandoned by the man she chose to save.

 

 

Emily Lazerwitz, The Weavers (Ariadne, Philomela, Penelope), machine knit scarves, hand-punched knitting machine pattern, butcher meat hooks, photo credit: Yiman Lin.

 

 

Slade MFA Interim Show 2015/16, installation view, photo credit: Yiman Lin.

 

Yuxin Su's Seats for guests and Emily Lazerwitz's Enigma were successfully funded through the art:i:curate art crowd funding platform. Find out more about how to become a patron of arts.  



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