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Curated by NoLIta participant Alex Hinckfuss

Curated by NoLIta participant Alex Hinckfuss
Curated by NoLIta participant Alex Hinckfuss shot by Ky Katrensky

As part of our 'Curated by NoLIta' project, we met with the curators: the people living and working in the neighborhood.

 

Ky Katrensky met with Alex Hinckfuss, a Polish/Aussie in New York.

 

 

KK: Why did you get involved with art:i:curate and this project? 

AH: It's a groovy project. Anything to help creatives.  

 

KK: What do you hope to take away from it?

AHDiscover and support local artists. 

 

KK: How do you normally take in art?

AH: Through museum exhibitions. But that can get overwhelming and sometimes too mainstream. I’m looking forward to a curated experience that is more informal.

 

KK: What does the term "curating" mean to you?

AH: When you walk through the Met you transition from a room filled with ancient African art, primarily rough, wood carvings of animals, into a room filled with delicate marble sculptures of the human form from ancient Greek and Roman times. This juxtaposition makes your mind race. To me that’s curating.

 

KK: Where did you live before and where are you from?

AH: I lived in Notting Hill, London for a long time. I'm Polish/Aussie.   

 

KK: What sets NoLIta apart from the surrounding neighborhoods?

AH: It's still very much a neighbourhood. There aren’t many of those left in the City.  

 

KK: Favorite New York moment?

AH: I once asked a homeless person to help me carry a discarded bench up a 4 story walk-up. It was 5am in the morning and at the time it seemed like a brilliant idea to have a bench on the rooftop. We ended up having breakfast and chatting till the sun came up. I learnt the man had been quite a successful amateur boxer in his prime. I love New York for its stories.

 

KK: Do you know any of your neighbors?

AH: I do, but only the ones in my building. One acknowledges others but unless you have a dog there’s very little opportunity for interaction. People are always rushing somewhere.

 

KK: Do you hope to connect with your neighbors through this project?

AH: It would be lovely.

 

KK: Are there any notable neighborhood characters?

AH: Aren’t they all?

 

KK: Do you have a local hangout spot in the neighborhood?

AH: In NoLIta, the Elisabeth Street Garden is a gem.

 

KK: Have you heard any stories about the history of NoLIta? 

AH: I love the Germania Bank Building story, that graffiti covered, abandoned looking building on Bowery and Spring. The owner, a photographer, has owned it since the 60’s and despite a number of approaches from developers, he refuses to sell. Epic.
There are 72 rooms in the building and apparently they discovered a whole new floor after decades of living there!

 

KK: What do you see as the future of NoLIta? 

AH: Little Italy and NoLIta should be one and the same. 

 

KK: Tell me something about yourself. 

AH: I’m on the love side of the Vegemite battle. 



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