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MCMXIV || 1914


artist | Bianca Salvo

2014

Mixed media / Edition of 3

25 × 19 cm / 9.8 × 7.5 in

Giclée print on Fabriano paper, tracing paper.

The project MCMXIV investigates historical events which might have been obscured by World War I but still have had a fundamental role in civilisation processes and the idealistic and optimistic construction of the ... Read more
Giclée print on Fabriano paper, tracing paper.

The project MCMXIV investigates historical events which might have been obscured by World War I but still have had a fundamental role in civilisation processes and the idealistic and optimistic construction of the future.

From the launch of the very first commercial flight to the introduction of the assembly line by Henry Ford, the series aims to open a window onto remote happenings mainly concerning with human evolution that still has an influence on contemporary society.

Just before the take-off, Percival Fansler, a businessman associated with designer and aircraft manufacturer Thomas W. Benoist, stated: “What was impossible yesterday is an accomplishment today, while tomorrow heralds the unbelievable.” He was right; Thursday, January 1, 1914, at about 9:30 am, the St. Petersburg-Tampa Airboat Line operated the very first scheduled airline flight, a 23-minutes hop across Tampa Bay that covered 18.6 miles. The first customer was the former mayor of St. Petersburg, Abram Pheil, who paid $400 at auction for the ticket. Tony Jannus piloted the airboat flying just 15 feet above the water. Travel time was greatly reduced, demonstrating that commercial airlines could be successful and a potential market for air travel and transport could be initiated. Read less
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