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Rebecca Chamberlain

artist  |  Rebecca Chamberlain

New York

About
Quick facts
Rebecca Chamberlain has worked widely across disciplines, from painting and performance to fashion design. Her paintings and drawings consider the boundaries of public and private spaces and the psychological and physical impact of architecture. 'I am attentive to environments, both domestic or vocational, as an extension and reflection of their inhabitants. What are our ideals? What makes us feel safe? And how? For the past decade I have articulated these ... Read more
Rebecca Chamberlain has worked widely across disciplines, from painting and performance to fashion design. Her paintings and drawings consider the boundaries of public and private spaces and the psychological and physical impact of architecture.

'I am attentive to environments, both domestic or vocational, as an extension and reflection of their inhabitants. What are our ideals? What makes us feel safe? And how? For the past decade I have articulated these ideas in both ballpoint and lithography ink paintings of vacant scenes and domestic objects.

The geometry of rooms rhythmically connects and disconnects through an emphasis on line and plane in monochromatic, often multi-panel paintings on a vintage architectural drafting material and most recently on fabric wrapped wood panels. Empty furniture, architectural details, interstitial moments between rooms become traces of the humans that inhabited and created these environments and seem to offer more human emotions than a face or figure could. The vacancy allows the viewer some room and resonant stories of how we might like to perform the act of living unfold.

Early Modernism (specifically the interwar period) and its stylistic timelessness, anonymity and embodiment of humanist ideals is a significant point of reference. I look at sanatoriums, housing projects, private homes, offices and factories from the 1920s and 1930s as continually relevant examples of the human need to feel safe against the backdrop of a world in political, cultural and economic chaos.' Read less
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